A Showcase of How Alameda County Employees Care for their Communities

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Early Educator Apprenticeship Program

graduates sitting in caps, gowns, and masksOn Saturday, August 15, 2020 forty-four (44) individuals represented the graduating Class of 2020 who received either an Associate or Assistant Teacher Permit, AA Degree, MA Degree or FDA Family Development Credential. Of the 44 graduates, about 13 CalWORKs recipients received an Associate Teacher Permit. They marched into the parking lot wearing white caps and gowns to the tune of “Pomp and Circumstance, No. 1” by Sir Edward Elgar. This is the first graduation of the Alameda County Social Services Agency/Tipping Point/First 5-funded apprenticeship program. A resounding message at the graduation was that funding from these three agencies allowed the graduates to get their permit without having to come out of their pockets to pay for this program.  At the Saturday event, there was an outpouring of support from family, children, and friends who blew their horns and cheered as each graduate’s name was called to accept their certificate. After posing for a picture with their certificates, each graduate was presented with a transition bag that included items to help them as they transition to full-time employment and their AA degrees.

The graduation ceremony took place in the parking lot of the YMCA’s Ralph Hawley Center in Emeryville, CA. It was a “car-based, social distance, wear your mask” graduation, with the special guest speaker being Dr. Joya Chavarin, Dean at Berkeley Community College, and the Student Commencement speaker was one of the Social Services Agency’s CalWORKs participants who vowed to continue her career path of helping black and brown children assimilate into society and become successful adults . In her words, “there are no bad kids, there are just kids who are in need of a lot of love and direction.”

The CalWORKs cohort, consisting of timed-out individuals, active participants and non-needy caretaker relatives, began their journey of obtaining an Associate Teacher Permit about a year ago, with each participant receiving a $1,000 stipend 6-months into the program and another $1,000 stipend at completion of the program. Many of Saturday’s graduates, by a show of hands, plan to continue on this career path by now working towards obtaining an AA Degree. What’s special about this group is that when the Shelter in Place Order was executed, they had to quickly transition from in-person classroom learning to distance/virtual learning, which was unprecedented for the instructors and students. As a bonus for staying in the program, the graduates will keep the laptops that were used as part of their distance/virtual learning.

According to Pamm Shaw, Vice President, Early Childhood Impact, YMCA of the East Bay, most of the graduates will be working for the “Y” full time, because there are enough openings to accommodate all who want to work. The Y will be expanding programs in Hayward, CA this fall and will be looking for even more staff in that area.

Heroes of the Week

Each week we will highlight county employees for heroism, acts of kindness and exceptional service to the community

The County Salutes a Winning Team!

The Alameda County Public Health Department’s Division of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention (DCDCP) is among the longest serving Bay Area front-line teams working on the pandemic. Comprised of clinicians, epidemiologists, statisticians, public health investigators, the Health Officer, and
the Public Health Lab, this group of heroes has led the COVID-19 response for Alameda County since January 22, 2020.

The DCDCP Team is a division within the Health Department, where its purview includes all aspects of infectious disease and public health preparedness and response activities. Their day to day work includes preventing and controlling the spread of more than 80 infectious diseases that are reportable by law to the State, including TB, HIV and STDs. They also oversee the County’s immunization program.

The team springs into emergency action when there are outbreaks. The team was monitoring the Wuhan outbreak in December and activated its emergency response on January 22. Led by Health Officer, Dr. Erica Pan and DCDCP Director, Dr. Nicholas Moss, this team forms the foundation of HCSA’s Department Operations Center, which now includes nearly 300 people across the agency.

DCDCP is at the core of the County’s COVID-19 containment and mitigation strategy, which includes testing, investigating all cases and close contacts of cases, providing clinical and community guidance, and ensuring that all Alameda County residents have the resources they need to safely isolate and quarantine. Working around the clock, the team’s scope has expanded to include direct support for longterm care facilities, Santa Rita Jail, homeless encampments, and management of medical volunteers.

Thank you, DCDCP for leading the way in saving thousands of lives!

Stories

CAO Book Drive

Looking for a way to give back to the community and also support a fellow County department, staff at the County Administrator’s Office (CAO) reached out to the County Library to host a book drive at their offices.

The CAO teamed up to purchase old favorites, fun board books, early reader books, and a variety of others to be donated to children visiting incarcerated parents or guardians at Santa Rita and Glenn-Dyer Jails. Nearly 140 children’s books and cash donations were collected for Start With a Story – a great feat during an already busy holiday season!

In the U.S., an estimated 2.7 million children, ages 5-18, have a justice-involved parent and around 10 million children experience parental incarceration at some point in their lives.

An Alameda County Librarian who runs the jail’s inmate literacy services initiated Start With A Story in early 2007 after watching children wait in line for hours — often an entire day — to spend a few minutes with their incarcerated loved ones. An untapped opportunity to provide literacy outreach to these youngsters was recognized, and since then, Start with a Story has delivered story times, free books, and family literacy activities to children, 0-16 years old, who come for visits at Alameda County jails.In 2018, roughly 2,300 books were distributed through Start With a Story.

For more information on Start With a Story and how you can help, contact Lisa Harris, Director of Social Justice Services at lisa.harris@acgov.org or Raul Rodriguez, Jails Literacy Specialist at rrodriguez@acgov.org.

Volunteer

“The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the grandest intention.”

Oscar Wilde

Alameda County employees play many roles in delivering a wide range of vital services to our communities like health, well-being, safety, vital, recreational, and infrastructure. Our employees are proud to continue their community service off hours too. We collectively volunteer our time to helping local non-profit agencies, and programs deliver their services to the community.

The organizations could use your help too.  Won’t you join us in caring for the communities around you.

You can get started by viewing the opportunities in your area.

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA):

A Real Difference

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The Time Is Now! Volunteer registration is open for the 2019/2020 Tax Season.

Combined Charities

The mission of the annual Combined Charities program is to provide a platform for Alameda County employees to give to the charity of their choice.  Pledges are made annually through one-time requests or via payroll deduction to help spread the donation over the year.  Workplace campaigns are a very efficient form of non-profit fundraising to help make our community and world a better place.

2018

$ 384,689

2017

$383,811

2016

$395,988

2015

$394,862

Alameda County employees create imaginative displays out of non-perishable food to fight hunger in our community during the annual Stone Soup Competition! Now in its eighth year, the Stone Soup Drive has provided thousands of meals for East Bay families.

19 DEPARTMENTS

$13,000 RAISED

16 TONS OF FOOD

You can help contribute in the fight to end hunger, too! Alameda County Food Bank takes donations year-round.

Stone Soup Food Drive Displays
Photos and Video

Mentorship

Alameda County is proud to host a number of wide-ranging Mentorship programs throughout the year.
Find out which of our varying programs might be a great fit for you, and check back to see if the opportunity you’re interested in is accepting applications.

Youth Leadership Academy

A program that gives high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to learn about and discuss County programs and services, develop leadership skills and meet students from schools throughout Alameda County.

Citizens Academy

A 6-session interactive program that provides insight to County services and operations and offers opportunities for civic engagement in the County.

Student Internship Program

The internship program at the Alameda County provides the interns an opportunity to work on the latest technologies solving real business problems under the guidance of an experienced professional.

Disaster Relief Fund

“Each of us as human beings has a responsibility to reach out to help our brothers and sisters affected by disasters. One day it may be us or our loved ones needing someone to reach out and help.”

Michael W. Hawkins, American Red Cross

The United States is responding to an outbreak of respiratory disease known as COVID-19 that has now been detected in worldwide, and communities everywhere are dealing with unprecedented challenges. We have asked the Board of Supervisors to formally approve the reactivation of the Alameda County Disaster Relief Fund to enable Alameda County employees and people in the community to voluntarily make cash and/or online donations to benefit the victims of this unprecedented event.

The Alameda County Disaster Relief Fund was initially established in response to the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States and has been reactivated several times to help victims of tragic events including mass shootings, hurricanes, earthquakes and fires.

We assure you that all contributions to the Alameda County Disaster Relief Fund will go directly to helping the many people impacted by COVID-19.

COVID-19: Donate Personal Protective Equipment

The County is organizing donations of much needed personal protective equipment (PPE). We can only accept new items in original packaging.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):

  • Donating 100 individual pieces of PPE or less? Donate
    directly to hospitals, long-term care facilities, or the
    local fire department.
  • Donating 100 individual pieces of PPE or more? Email
    covid.donations@acgov.org with a list of items to be
    donated and you will receive drop-off information.

Supplies we need include:

N95 or P100 Respirator Masks
Surgical Masks
Protective Gowns
Disposable Gloves
Hand Sanitizer
Disinfectants & Wipes
Goggles & Eye Protection